Conference Agenda

29-30 August 2024

IIC Expo Centre, Dwarka, New Delhi

Green Hydrogen Investment Strategies for India

3-5 August 2023: Dwarka, New Delhi

Preliminary/ To be refined

Day 1 | 3rd August 2023

0800

Registration & Coffee

0900 - 0930

Inaugural Session

0930 - 1000

Transitioning the Current Hydrogen Demand and Supply to Green Hydrogen

India currently consumes almost 6 million tonnes of grey hydrogen largely concentrated in industrial uses in refining and as feedstock to produce ammonia and methanol. Current hydrogen consumption is almost equally split between refining and ammonia production with a small share of consumption in methanol production. A small quantity of hydrogen, amounting to 0.3 million tonnes, is already being consumed for steel production. Beyond these sectors, initial assessment indicates emerging potential demand in heavy-duty, long-haul freight transportation and to a limited extent in the power sector. How can these be transitioned to Green Hydrogen

1000 - 1030

Is the Hydrogen Colour Debate an Obstacle to Uptake

The existing strategies cite divergent forms of hydrogen based on colour or carbon intensity of production for 2030 and 2050. The choice of hydrogen production methods depends largely on the resources available and existing energy systems within each country, as well as the policy objectives being pursued (i.e., decarbonisation, fostering economic growth, etc.). They also resort to diverse terminologies with differing assumptions and attitudes towards certain technologies. Most notably, hydrogen produced using nuclear energy has a variety of different colour categorisations.

1030 - 1100

Interventions Required on the Supply-Side that can help reduce the cost of green hydrogen to $1/kg

The current Green Hydrogen policy already focuses on measures like waiver of inter-state transmission (ISTS) charges and granting of open access for green hydrogen and green ammonia production. Other measures could include reduction in taxes and surcharges, preferential dollar-based electricity tariff, revenue recycling of any carbon tax, low-emission power purchase agreements (PPAs), and avenues for firming electricity supply including discounted grid electricity to complement variable renewable energy (VRE) generation. All these via government initiative can encourage the cost economics of early producers.

1100 - 1130

Refreshment & Networking Break

1130 - 1200

Facilitating Hydrogen Uptake: The Role of Public-Private Partnerships

Private-Public Partnerships (PPPs) can be an important lever for hydrogen development by coordinating public and private sector efforts. Hydrogen’s momentum is more likely to be built through private sector engagement with government support via an enabling environment (e.g., carbon-pricing, favourable investment climate). Government-led Special Purpose Company (SPC) that are being launched in several countries with support on financing and taxation to develop hydrogen-fuelled applications.

1200 - 1230

Creating a Biomethane Boom: Understanding the Role of Biogas in Decarbonising Industry

The Ukraine conflict has put critical pressure on gas supplies and increased the price of fertilisers. As a consequence, biogas has gained remarkable attention as a local source of both gas for energy and biofertiliser for agriculture. Incorporating a biogas system in each country would limit global warming to 2 °C. If suitable policies mechanisms are implemented, the biogas industry could reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by 3.29–4.36 gigatonnes carbon dioxide equivalent, which represent about 10–13% of global emissions.

1230 - 1300

An Introduction to Green Methanol and It’s Applications in Industry

Methanol is an important raw material for the chemical, construction and plastics industries, but the conventional production process is not particularly green. Industry is looking for climate-friendly alternative. By synthesizing renewable methanol from hydrogen and carbon dioxide we can help to tackle climate change by mitigating the impact of greenhouse gases.

1300 - 1400

Networking & Lunch Break

1400 - 1430

Assessing The Decarbonisation Opportunities of Green Ammonia

Ammonia will play a critical role in food security and the energy transition as part of a sustainable long-term energy mix given its many potential applications. One of the critical essentials to achieve green ammonia are carbon capture and storage (CCS) and green H2 from electrolysis respectively. Whast are the other key applications of Green Ammonia and what role will it play in decarbonisation

1430 - 1500

Promotion of Exports of Green Hydrogen and Green Hydrogen-Embedded Products through a Global Hydrogen Alliance

The government must explore integrating hydrogen into existing energy and industrial partnerships globally. This should include developing collective frameworks and creating labelling and standards around green hydrogen and hydrogen-embedded products like green steel and green ammonia. The government should explore specific near-term incentives around green ammonia and green steel production. How can this be implemented and how can the industry partner such initiatives

1500 - 1530

Creating a Global Market for Green Ammonia

Building a global market for green ammonia will require significant expansion of end use from more cost- sensitive fertilizer and industry to energy applications, which potentially could absorb slightly higher cost in the right geographies. Identifying and encouraging applications that can pay a higher green premium need to be supported. Decarbonization goals have and will continue to dictate the longer-term direction of green ammonia.

1530 - 1600

Three Gases, One Pipeline: How Will Hydrogen, Biomethane, and Natural Gas mix into the grid?

while the existing gas network is compatible with biomethane, much of it is not yet hydrogen- compatible. replacing pipelines can ensure the grid is compatible with both green gases. Gas grid working with hydrogen/methane can make dispatchable renewable electricity. No retrofitting of the grid is required until 50% of RES share. Till 50% of RES share, it is convenient to use hydrogen only to shave the RES peaks. Hydrogen injected in the grid allows converting renewable electricity into heat. Gas grid can be used as unique energy storage system till 65% of RES share.

1600 - 1630

Networking & Refreshments

1630 - 1700

With Innovation Cycles at the Peak is it the Right Time for Introducing Standards

Standards and certification mechanisms can help harmonise processes important for hydrogen development. The development of a common language for hydrogen and some rules shared at the international level could establish a level playing field by enabling effective cross-border trade and providing more certainty to investors. At this stage, however, standardisation priorities differ widely between countries making collaboration more difficult and delaying developing hydrogen demand and investment.

1700 - 1730

CO2 and Energy Import Savings The Green Hydrogen Advantage

This transition has significant impact on the greenhouse gas emissions of the hard-to-abate sectors. Cumulatively, between 2020 and 2050, India can abate 3.6 giga tonnes of CO2 emissions compared with a limited hydrogen adoption case. When looked at from an energy security perspective, domestically produced green hydrogen can translate to a net energy import savings of $246–$358 billion cumulatively between 2020 and 2050 ($3–$5 billion between 2020 and 2030 alone).

1730 - 1800

The Realities of Exporting Green Hydrogen from India

India aspires to become an export hub for green hydrogen and specifically for electrolysers. This is one of the prime targets of the National Hydrogen Mission. A thriving local production ecosystem will not only create a domestic market but is expected to push exports as well, especially to countries such as Japan, South Korea, Singapore, and others. Export is considered lucrative since companies draw higher profit margins. What are the challenges associated with exports and what can be the effective ways

1800

Closing remarks Followed by refreshment

Day 2 | 4th August 2023

0800

Registration & Coffee

0900 - 0930

Inaugural Session

0930 - 1000

Blended Finance for Green Hydrogen

World over financing green hydrogen is the biggest issue that leaders are pondering over. With most looking to governments and development finance agencies to seed the projects which could have limiting effects as governments have multiple priorities. Blended finance, which combines concessional public funds with commercial funds, can be a powerful means to direct more commercial finance toward impactful investments that are unable to proceed on strictly commercial terms. One of the most compelling aspects of blended finance is that it uses relatively small amounts of donor funding to rebalance a project’s risk profile.

1000 - 1030

Catching the Green Financing Wave

The wave of green and ESG-linked liquidity that has overtaken the power industry has largely passed by the heavy transport, mining and industrial production sectors. Financiers and project developers targeting these sectors that can find answers to the challenges described in this article will be well positioned to catch this wave.

1030 - 1100

Green Hydrogen Financing Risks

The gold standard for project financing is a long-term, fixed-price offtake contract with a utility or other public or quasi-public purchaser. The power and public transportation sectors may provide the best early opportunities for hydrogen project developers to sign such contracts. However, many offtake structures will depend on corporate offtakers.

1100 - 1130

Refreshment & Networking Break

1130 - 1200

Facilitate Investment through Demand Aggregation and Dollar-based Bidding for Green Hydrogen

The government can provide financial certainty to early adopters through investment facilitation measures like demand aggregation, ensuring availability of long-tenor and low interest finance and initiation of a functioning carbon market.

1200 - 1230

Understanding the Bankability of Green Hydrogen in Indian Context

What factors will be crucial for the development of a successful clean hydrogen market. Will the bankability challenges of green hydrogen be different from other types of project financing considering the fact that the investment requirements will be not just for production, but transportation, storage, and other infrastructure. What will be the specific risk factors around the financing of green hydrogen compared to other renewable energy projects, such as Wind and Solar Can developers of renewable projects simply add green hydrogen into their portfolios?

1230 - 1300

The Opportunities & Challenges Associated with Financing a Project with Multiple Stakeholders

An electrolyser used to make green hydrogen is of no use without a sufficient source of water and renewable energy as feedstock, a way to store and transport the output, and an offtaker to buy and use the output. Lenders to any part of the chain will have to ensure that all the linked elements will be developed as intended and on time to ensure debt repayment. At the same time, to find financing under a project finance model, hydrogen projects will have to demonstrate a sufficiently discrete revenue stream against which financing can be raised, with a collateral package comprised of assets in which the special-purpose entity owning the project has an indivisible ownership or other property interest that can serve as security for the financing.

1300 - 1400

Networking & Lunch Break

1400 - 1430

Targeted Viability Gap Funding (VGF)

A targeted viability gap funding (VGF) mechanism that can help address industry-specific cost differentials/ green premiums for some of the possible early markets should be considered in India and ammonia could be ideal sectors for a targeted VGF approach in the initial phase of green hydrogen development. This is due to the current size of hydrogen consumption and the potential to replace grey with green hydrogen. The impact of hydrogen on the price of refinery products is much less than that of ammonia where hydrogen as a feedstock constitutes almost 80%–90% of the cost of end products like urea.

1430 - 1500

Financing Green Hydrogen Linked Manufacturing in India

Demand for electrolysers is expected to increase manifold till 2050and will translate into cumulative electrolyser capacity demand of 20 GW by 2030 and 226 GW by 2050, promising a sizeable opportunity for indigenous manufacturing of a global emerging energy technology. Similarly the fuel cell demand through heavy-duty trucking alone presents a $4 billion market opportunity by 2050 in India, amounting to 10%–18% of global fuel cell demand by 2050. Similar to electrolysers, this could create opportunities for domestic manufacturing in India. Market size and manufacturing opportunities for fuel cells can be even greater if stationary fuel cell systems also play a role in the future.

1500 - 1530

1530 - 1600

1600 - 1630

Networking & Refreshments

1630 - 1700

1700 - 1730

1730 - 1800

1800

Closing remarks Followed by refreshment

Day 3 | 5th August 2023

0800

Registration & Coffee

0900 - 0930

Inaugural Session

0930 - 1000

Electrolysers - India’s Domestic Manufacturing Opportunity

Demand for electrolysers is expected to increase manifold till 2050. From a price parity basis alone, green hydrogen’s share of this demand could grow from 16% in 2030 to almost 94% by 2050. This translates to an implied cumulative electrolyser capacity demand of 20 GW by 2030 and 226 GW by 2050, promising a sizeable opportunity for indigenous manufacturing of a global emerging energy technology. The cumulative value of the green hydrogen market in India could be $8 billion by 2030 and $340 billion by 2050. Electrolyser market size could be approximately $5 billion by 2030 and $31 billion by 2050.

1000 - 1030

Fuel Cells - India’s Domestic Manufacturing Opportunity

Fuel cell demand through heavy-duty trucking alone presents a $4 billion market opportunity by 2050 in India, amounting to 10%–18% of global fuel cell demand by 2050. Similar to electrolysers, this could create opportunities for domestic manufacturing in India. Market size and manufacturing opportunities for fuel cells can be even greater if stationary fuel cell systems also play a role in the future.

1030 - 1100

Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carriers: A Silver Bullet for Transporting Hydrogen?

Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carrier (LOHC) technologies provide an effective alternative solution by chemically bonding hydrogen to a stable organic liquid carrier, thereby eliminating the need for compression and making it safer, more practical and more cost-efficient to transport hydrogen using existing conventional fuel. Could this be an efficient solution till pipelines come into existence.

1100 - 1130

Refreshment & Networking Break

1130 - 1200

Electrolyser Technology Review and Implications for India

The market for electrolysers is dominated by alkaline and polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) technologies with advanced electrolyser technologies like solid oxide and anion exchange membrane nearing commercial deployment as well. The fundamental components of the electrolyser consist of the stack and a large array of balance of plant (BoP) components. What could be the opportunities emerging for India from the innovations happening in the Electrolyser domain

1200 - 1230

Hydrogen Compression, an Important Element for an Efficient and Profitable Value Chain

A major challenge for the hydrogen is its low volumetric energy density, which makes using it at very high pressures and with very large volumes a necessity to overcome this challenge. The compression is the tool we achieve this, and why the compressors are the only key equipment that sits everywhere across the hydrogen value chain. This makes the compression a key element across the Hydrogen Value Chain and plays a role in reducing the levelized cost of hydrogen and enable the hydrogen economy.

1230 - 1300

Leveraging Existing Assets and Infrastructure to Scale up the Hydrogen Economy

Hydrogen is a versatile energy carrier and its applications today range across a number of industries such as oil refining, ammonia and steel production. This allows us to leverage existing assets and infrastructure to scale up the hydrogen economy by combining a range of new technologies enabling the basis for regional hydrogen hubs.

1300 - 1400

Networking & Lunch Break

1400 - 1430

Opportunities and Challenges to Upgrading Gas Networks for Hydrogen Blending or 100% H2 and Related Projects

The session will describe opportunities for gas networks to repurpose to blended and 100% hydrogen, the associated technical and economic issues, the key pilot projects, and the need for focused policies to ensure that hydrogen pipeline networks can realise their full potential.

1430 - 1500

Thermal Management in Green Hydrogen Production: Design Considerations

Central cooling systems for large-scale green hydrogen production can be based on wet or dry cooling. But there also exist hybrid solutions. What are the design considerations to go for completely dry or wet cooling? When would it be better to take adiabatic cooling? Of course project location and associated ambient conditions play a role.

1500 - 1530

Ammonia for Hydrogen Transport, Storage and Utilisation

The long-distance transport of liquid hydrogen remains challenging owing to a high energy penalty associated with liquification and extreme transport conditions. The use of ammonia (NH3) for hydrogen transport and storage offers a promising alternative supply route. The required infrastructure for inland logistics, such as ammonia barges, pipelines and storage facilities are mature technologies and are in commercial use worldwide (though not yet on the required scale).

1530 - 1600

Technology Innovation Essentials to use Hydrogen Combustion for Power Generation

While fossil gas is often seen as a transition fuel towards a fully decarbonised energy mix, experts believe there is a strong potential to convert power plants to run 100% on clean hydrogen by 2030. There are combustion technologies that are capable of operating on a wide range of hydrogen concentrations up to ~100% (by volume).  What could be the solutions for Indian power generation industry

1600 - 1630

Networking & Refreshments

1630 - 1700

Fire Protection and Cryogenic Spill Protection for Hydrogen Production, Storage and Processing

The production, storage and further processing of hydrogen will increase significantly in the coming years. Hydrogen is increasingly needed as an energy storage medium and as a raw material, e.g. for the production of synthetic hydrocarbons. Due to its chemical and physical properties, hydrogen places special demands on plant safety. 

1700 - 1730

Hydrogen Storage: Scaling up Storage Solutions for a Robust Hydrogen Supply Chain

Whilst most of the conversation starts with hydrogen production and end-use, infrastructure to support development of hydrogen supply chain will be critical. It will entail vast storage needs at various stages of the value chain, to cope with variability of production and offtake patterns and ensure security of supply. A wide range of storage solutions do exist or are in development to cover all these needs, covering various sizes, from kilograms up to thousands of tons of H2, and diverse storage systems, from cylinders to storage in tubulars, all the way to geologic reservoirs like salt caverns.

1730 - 1800

1800

Closing remarks Followed by refreshment